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City of Tarpon Springs
Copyright © 2015 City of Tarpon Springs. All rights registered.
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Fire Rescue

Public Safety Facility, Station 69: (727) 938-3737, 444 South Huey Ave, Fax (727) 934-0598

Station 70: 1025 Gulf Rd, Fax (727) 943-4064

Station 71:  1600 L & R Industrial Boulevard

History:

Tarpon Springs is a historic community located on the west coast of Florida a few miles north of Clearwater and about 35 miles west of Tampa. Settled in 1882, Tarpon Springs has grown from a small settlement to a city of nearly 25,000 today. It is bordered on the north by the Anclote River, on the west by the Gulf of Mexico and on the east by Lake Tarpon. Tarpon Springs is on a peninsula at the northwestern tip of Pinellas County. As word spread about the healthful climate, natural springs, and the abundant fishing in the Gulf of Mexico, the population grew quickly. Many large wooden structures were built by wealthy residents in the late 1890s. Fishing and sponge harvesting became the central economic activity in the area. As a result of the resort-type building construction and new industry, fire hazards increased. The first major recorded incident was a massive fire that burned most of the city center in 1894. The need for a fire department became apparent. Made up of local residents and business owners, the Tarpon Springs Volunteer Fire Department was established in 1895. Equipped with only crude tools, the volunteer firefighters used enormous physical effort to protect residents and visitors to this growing town. They responded to the fire bell from their homes and businesses with dedication and alacrity. The City’s first fire station was constructed in 1915 at the northeast corner of Pinellas Avenue and Lemon Street. The two-story brick City Hall building also housed the Office of the Mayor, City Clerk and the Library. Fire apparatus and training had improved somewhat and were conducted using the latest knowledge and technology of the time. On January 26, 1932 Thomas B. Guthrie was appointed chief of the Fire Department. He was the first paid firefighter in the City of Tarpon Springs. Chief Guthrie was responsible for the maintenance of all fire vehicles and tools, as well as the repairs and maintenance of the entire City fleet of vehicles. He earned $75 per month. In 1947 the Fire Department was reorganized. Paid firefighters were hired and Tommy Thompson, the City’s second fire chief, was appointed. He was trained by the military at MacDill Air Force Base and had served as a volunteer in Tarpon Springs for six years prior to his appointment. In 1963 a new combined fire and police station was constructed at 325 Lemon Street. During this time the City had three paid firefighters in addition to Chief Thompson, and relied on the response of the volunteers for additional manpower. Upon the passing of Chief Tommy Thompson in 1973, Kenneth Ennis took over the reins. A new era began in the fire service. There was much progress and modernization during Chief Ennis's tenure. In 1977 a second fire station was constructed on Gulf Road to respond more quickly to emergencies on the west side of the city and to support the Lemon Street station. Fire Station 2 was dedicated to the memory of Chief Thompson. It was during this time that the department expanded to 15 paid firefighters and a clerical staff of one. Advances were made in professional training, certifications and equipment as technological progress was significant at that time. It was during the early 1970s that the Tarpon Springs Fire Department took on a more proactive approach to fire prevention and fire safety by presenting fire prevention programs to schools and the general public. TSFD was now conducting fire inspections at businesses and schools. October 1982 was very significant as Emergency Medical Services were added to the Department's responsibilities. This had a profound impact as all members now had to be trained as an Emergency Medical Technician or Paramedic as well as firefighter. The Department also added "Rescue” vehicles in both stations. This added to the number needed to adequately respond to the growing number of emergency calls. By the end of 1984, the department had 33 line personnel and an administrative staff which consisted of four Chief Officers and a clerical staff of two. The 1980s were a busy time for tropical weather activity. In August of 1985 Hurricane Elena proved to be quite disruptive as it churned for three days in the Gulf of Mexico just off the shores of Tarpon Springs. This storm, coupled with Hurricane Andrew in 1992, and other tropical activity created a need for TSFD to become active in a new industry referred to as Emergency Management. Upon the retirement of Chief Ennis in 1989, Al Carr became the fourth Fire Chief for the TSFD. Chief Carr was promoted from the ranks; he was a 20- year veteran of the department. Five years later Chief Al Carr retired. This allowed Harry Leonard, another long time member of the Department, to take the office of Fire Chief. He was the fourth successor to Thomas Guthrie and the city’s fifth Fire Chief. Chief Leonard served from 1994 until he retired in July 2002. The Public Safety Facility, a two-story, state-of-the-art structure to house the Fire/Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Management, Emergency Operations Center, Police and Code Enforcement departments, was completed April 2001. It was at this time when the Lemon Street station was closed and the new Public Safety Facility became TSFD headquarters. The Public Safety Facility is built to withstand the effects of a Category 3 Hurricane and is completely self-sufficient. Upon the relocation from Lemon Street to 444 Huey Avenue, Tarpon Springs Fire Department became Tarpon Springs Fire Rescue. In August 2002, the City of Tarpon Springs appointed its sixth fire chief, Kevin R Bowman, who served until October 2005. The City of Tarpon Springs's seventh Fire Chief was also the first brought in from a national search and interview process. Stephen R. M. Moreno III was Chief from November 2005 until February 2010. Chief Moreno served as Fire Chief in Americus, Georgia prior to coming to Tarpon Springs Fire Rescue. The Department implemented public outreach programs via alternative teaching methods shortly after Chief Moreno’s arrival. Several firefighters are certified “fire clowns” for the safety education of children. Puppet shows as well as many programs were made available to the public to enhance their fire-safety knowledge. Firefighters have already visited several thousand homes for the purpose of testing, repairing or installing smoke detectors. This program will eventually have every home in Tarpon Springs visited by its firefighters. Young adults are invited to be a part of the fire service as a member of the local Explorers Post. This introduces interested teenagers to the day-to- day activities involved in the Fire and Emergency Medical Services duties and career paths leading to a position in the Department. Today’s Tarpon Springs Fire Rescue is staffed by 36 line personnel, Chief Scott Young, two Deputy Chiefs, Craig Miesner and Richard Walsh, Fire Marshal Richard Kinney, and Executive Secretary Sara Rector. Various levels within the paramilitary structure are filled by a variety skilled individuals forming one professional organization. With 10.5 square miles, Tarpon Springs and its unincorporated area encompass about 28,000 residences and thousands of businesses. There is an average of over 4,000 emergency responses annually. A third fire station was completed on April 20, 2017 located at 1600 L & R Industrial Boulevard.
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City of Tarpon Springs
Copyright © 2015 City of Tarpon Springs. All rights registered

Fire Rescue

Public Safety Facility, Station 69: (727) 938-3737,

444 South Huey Ave, Fax (727) 934-0598

Station 70: 1025 Gulf Rd, Fax (727) 943-4064

Station 71:  1600 L & R Industrial Boulevard

History:

Tarpon Springs is a historic community located on the west coast of Florida a few miles north of Clearwater and about 35 miles west of Tampa. Settled in 1882, Tarpon Springs has grown from a small settlement to a city of nearly 25,000 today. It is bordered on the north by the Anclote River, on the west by the Gulf of Mexico and on the east by Lake Tarpon. Tarpon Springs is on a peninsula at the northwestern tip of Pinellas County. As word spread about the healthful climate, natural springs, and the abundant fishing in the Gulf of Mexico, the population grew quickly. Many large wooden structures were built by wealthy residents in the late 1890s. Fishing and sponge harvesting became the central economic activity in the area. As a result of the resort-type building construction and new industry, fire hazards increased. The first major recorded incident was a massive fire that burned most of the city center in 1894. The need for a fire department became apparent. Made up of local residents and business owners, the Tarpon Springs Volunteer Fire Department was established in 1895. Equipped with only crude tools, the volunteer firefighters used enormous physical effort to protect residents and visitors to this growing town. They responded to the fire bell from their homes and businesses with dedication and alacrity. The City’s first fire station was constructed in 1915 at the northeast corner of Pinellas Avenue and Lemon Street. The two-story brick City Hall building also housed the Office of the Mayor, City Clerk and the Library. Fire apparatus and training had improved somewhat and were conducted using the latest knowledge and technology of the time. On January 26, 1932 Thomas B. Guthrie was appointed chief of the Fire Department. He was the first paid firefighter in the City of Tarpon Springs. Chief Guthrie was responsible for the maintenance of all fire vehicles and tools, as well as the repairs and maintenance of the entire City fleet of vehicles. He earned $75 per month. In 1947 the Fire Department was reorganized. Paid firefighters were hired and Tommy Thompson, the City’s second fire chief, was appointed. He was trained by the military at MacDill Air Force Base and had served as a volunteer in Tarpon Springs for six years prior to his appointment. In 1963 a new combined fire and police station was constructed at 325 Lemon Street. During this time the City had three paid firefighters in addition to Chief Thompson, and relied on the response of the volunteers for additional manpower. Upon the passing of Chief Tommy Thompson in 1973, Kenneth Ennis took over the reins. A new era began in the fire service. There was much progress and modernization during Chief Ennis's tenure. In 1977 a second fire station was constructed on Gulf Road to respond more quickly to emergencies on the west side of the city and to support the Lemon Street station. Fire Station 2 was dedicated to the memory of Chief Thompson. It was during this time that the department expanded to 15 paid firefighters and a clerical staff of one. Advances were made in professional training, certifications and equipment as technological progress was significant at that time. It was during the early 1970s that the Tarpon Springs Fire Department took on a more proactive approach to fire prevention and fire safety by presenting fire prevention programs to schools and the general public. TSFD was now conducting fire inspections at businesses and schools. October 1982 was very significant as Emergency Medical Services were added to the Department's responsibilities. This had a profound impact as all members now had to be trained as an Emergency Medical Technician or Paramedic as well as firefighter. The Department also added "Rescue” vehicles in both stations. This added to the number needed to adequately respond to the growing number of emergency calls. By the end of 1984, the department had 33 line personnel and an administrative staff which consisted of four Chief Officers and a clerical staff of two. The 1980s were a busy time for tropical weather activity. In August of 1985 Hurricane Elena proved to be quite disruptive as it churned for three days in the Gulf of Mexico just off the shores of Tarpon Springs. This storm, coupled with Hurricane Andrew in 1992, and other tropical activity created a need for TSFD to become active in a new industry referred to as Emergency Management. Upon the retirement of Chief Ennis in 1989, Al Carr became the fourth Fire Chief for the TSFD. Chief Carr was promoted from the ranks; he was a 20-year veteran of the department. Five years later Chief Al Carr retired. This allowed Harry Leonard, another long time member of the Department, to take the office of Fire Chief. He was the fourth successor to Thomas Guthrie and the city’s fifth Fire Chief. Chief Leonard served from 1994 until he retired in July 2002. The Public Safety Facility, a two-story, state-of-the- art structure to house the Fire/Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Management, Emergency Operations Center, Police and Code Enforcement departments, was completed April 2001. It was at this time when the Lemon Street station was closed and the new Public Safety Facility became TSFD headquarters. The Public Safety Facility is built to withstand the effects of a Category 3 Hurricane and is completely self-sufficient. Upon the relocation from Lemon Street to 444 Huey Avenue, Tarpon Springs Fire Department became Tarpon Springs Fire Rescue. In August 2002, the City of Tarpon Springs appointed its sixth fire chief, Kevin R Bowman, who served until October 2005. The City of Tarpon Springs's seventh Fire Chief was also the first brought in from a national search and interview process. Stephen R. M. Moreno III was Chief from November 2005 until February 2010. Chief Moreno served as Fire Chief in Americus, Georgia prior to coming to Tarpon Springs Fire Rescue. The Department implemented public outreach programs via alternative teaching methods shortly after Chief Moreno’s arrival. Several firefighters are certified “fire clowns” for the safety education of children. Puppet shows as well as many programs were made available to the public to enhance their fire-safety knowledge. Firefighters have already visited several thousand homes for the purpose of testing, repairing or installing smoke detectors. This program will eventually have every home in Tarpon Springs visited by its firefighters. Young adults are invited to be a part of the fire service as a member of the local Explorers Post. This introduces interested teenagers to the day-to-day activities involved in the Fire and Emergency Medical Services duties and career paths leading to a position in the Department. Today’s Tarpon Springs Fire Rescue is staffed by 36 line personnel, Chief Scott Young, two Deputy Chiefs, Craig Miesner and Richard Walsh, Fire Marshal Richard Kinney, and Executive Secretary Sara Rector. Various levels within the paramilitary structure are filled by a variety skilled individuals forming one professional organization. With 10.5 square miles, Tarpon Springs and its unincorporated area encompass about 28,000 residences and thousands of businesses. There is an average of over 4,000 emergency responses annually. A third fire station was completed on April 20, 2017 located at 1600 L & R Industrial Boulevard.
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